USPSC Content and Digital Communications Advisor

USPSC Content and Digital Communications Advisor

USPSC Content and Digital Communications Advisor

USPSC Content and Digital Communications Advisor

USAID / OFDA
Published
July 12, 2022
Location
Washington, D.C.
Position type
Experience (minimum)
5-10 Years
Education (minimum)
High School
Travel required?
Not specified
Base salary (minimum)
$100,000 - 110,000

Description

SOLICITATION NUMBER: 720BHA22R00021  

ISSUANCE DATE: July 13, 2022  

CLOSING DATE AND TIME: August 03, 2022, 12:00 P.M. Eastern Time  SUBJECT: Solicitation for U.S. Personal Service Contractor (USPSC) 

Dear Prospective Offerors: 

The United States Government (USG), represented by the U.S. Agency for International  Development (USAID) Office of Global Policy, Partnerships, Programs, and Communications  (G3PC) is seeking offers from qualified U.S. citizens to provide personal service as a Content and  Digital Communications Advisor, under a United States Personal Services Contract (USPSC), as  described in the solicitation. 

Submittals must be in accordance with the attached information at the place and time specified.  Offerors interested in applying for this position MUST submit the following materials: 

  1. Complete resume. In order to fully evaluate your offer, your resume must include:  

(a) Paid and non-paid experience, job title, location(s), dates held (month/year), and hours  worked per week for each position. Any experience that does not include dates  (month/year), locations, and hours per week will not be counted towards meeting the  solicitation requirements. 

(b) Specific duties performed that fully detail the level and complexity of the work.  (c) Education and any other qualifications including job-related training courses, job-related  skills, or job-related honors, awards or accomplishments. Failure to identify an academic  discipline will result in disqualification.  

(d) U.S. Citizenship 

(e) Optional: How did you hear about this opportunity? (SAM.gov, BHA Jobs, Career Fair,  etc.).  

Your resume must contain sufficient information to make a valid determination that you fully  meet the experience requirements as stated in this solicitation. This information must be clearly  identified in your resume. Failure to provide information sufficient to determine your  qualifications for the position will result in loss of full consideration.  

  1. USPSC Offeror form AID 309-2. Offerors are required to complete sections A through I.  This form must be physically signed. Electronic signatures will not be accepted. AID 309-2  is available at http://www.usaid.gov/forms.

U.S. Agency for International Development 

1300 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW 

Washington, DC 20523 

www.usaid.gov 

720BHA22R00021 

NOTE REGARDING ENSURING ADEQUATE COVID-19 SAFETY PROTOCOLS FOR  FEDERAL CONTRACTORS 

The contractor will be required to show proof that the contractor is fully vaccinated against  COVID-19 on or before the first date of onboarding, or submit an approved reasonable  accommodation to the CO. If the contractor does not meet this requirement the contract may be  terminated. 

NOTE REGARDING UNIQUE ENTITY IDENTIFIER (UEI) NUMBER AND THE  SYSTEM FOR AWARD MANAGEMENT 

All USPSCs with a place of performance in the United States are required to have a Unique Entity  Identifier (UEI) number and be registered in the System for Award Management (SAM) database  prior to receiving an award. You will be disqualified if you either fail to comply with this  requirement or if your name appears on the excluded parties list. The selectee will be provided  with guidance regarding this registration. 

NOTE: As of March 28, 2018, all new SAM.gov entity registrations will now require a signed  notarized letter identifying the authorized Entity administrator for the entity associated with the  UEI number. Additional information on the format of the notarized letter and where to submit can  be found via the below Federal Service Desk link: 

https://www.fsd.gov/fsd-gov/answer.do?sysparm_kbid=d2e67885db0d5f00b3257d321f96194b& sysparm_search=kb0013183 

Instructions to obtain a UEI can be found via the SAM.gov link. 

Offerors can expect to receive a confirmation email when offer materials have been received.  Offerors should retain for their records copies of all enclosures which accompany their offers.  Your complete resume must be emailed to: 

G3PC Recruitment Team 

E-Mail Address: BHA.G3PCRecruitment@usaid.gov 

Website: www.BHAjobs.net 

Any questions on this solicitation may be directed to the G3PC Recruitment Team via the  information provided above. 

Sincerely, 

Sonja Stroud-Gooden 

Contracting Officer

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720BHA22R00021 

  1. GENERAL INFORMATION
  2. SOLICITATION NO.: 720BHA22R00021 
  3. ISSUANCE DATE: July 13, 2022 
  4. CLOSING DATE AND TIME FOR RECEIPT OF OFFERS: August 03, 2022, 12:00 P.M.  Eastern Time 
  5. POINT OF CONTACT: G3PC Recruitment Team, BHA.G3PCRecruitment@usaid.gov 5. POSITION TITLE: Content and Digital Communications Advisor 
  6. MARKET VALUE: $106,823 - $138,868 equivalent to GS-13 (includes locality pay) Salaries over and above the top of the pay range will not be entertained or negotiated. 

If the position is for a Washington based PSC, offerors who live outside the Washington, D.C.  area will be considered for employment, but no relocation expenses will be reimbursed.  

  1. PERIOD OF PERFORMANCE: Five (5) years  
  2. PLACE OF PERFORMANCE: Washington, D.C.  
  3. ELIGIBLE OFFERORS: U.S. Citizens 
  4. SECURITY LEVEL REQUIRED: Ability to obtain and maintain a Secret up to Top  Secret/Sensitive Compartmented Information level clearance as provided by USAID. 
  5. STATEMENT OF DUTIES  

POSITION DESCRIPTION 

BACKGROUND 

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID)’s Bureau for Humanitarian  Assistance (BHA) is responsible for facilitating and coordinating U.S. Government (USG)  humanitarian assistance overseas in response to all types of international disasters, including slow onset disasters such as droughts or famine, natural disasters such as earthquakes or floods, or man made disasters such as conflict or war. BHA is responsible for planning, coordinating, developing,  achieving, monitoring, and evaluating international humanitarian assistance falling into two  conceptual areas: 

  • Humanitarian Response activities comprise needs-based humanitarian assistance provided  to save lives, alleviate suffering, and protect human dignity during and in the aftermath of  emergencies. Humanitarian assistance is grounded in humanitarian principles and is  directed toward the most vulnerable populations. 

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  • Early Recovery, Risk Reduction, and Resilience (ER4) activities will set the initial  foundations for longer-term recovery as appropriate and will work in close conjunction  with humanitarian assistance. Early recovery is an approach that supports communities  impacted by crises to protect and restore basic systems and service delivery. Early recovery  builds on humanitarian response efforts and establishes the initial foundations of long-term  recovery. Early recovery activities are implemented for a specified, appropriate timeframe  that assists populations recovering from an identifiable shock. Risk reduction is the  prevention of new and reduction of existing disaster risk and management of residual risk,  which contributes to strengthening resilience and to the achievement of sustainable  development. Resilience is the ability of people, households, communities, countries, and  systems to mitigate, adapt to, and recover from shocks and stresses in a manner that reduces  chronic vulnerability and facilitates inclusive growth.  

BHA has seven offices, as follows:  

The Bureau’s three geographic offices are: (1) Office of Africa; (2) Office of Asia, Latin America  and the Caribbean; and (3) the Office of the Middle East, North Africa and Europe. Each  geographic office designs, provides, and assesses humanitarian assistance for their respective  regions, including assistance related to responding to, recovering from, and reducing the risk of  man-made and natural disasters, while linking with other USAID investments that build resilience. 

The Office of Global Policy, Partnerships, Programs, and Communications (G3PC) shapes and  influences USAID’s role within the international humanitarian system; leads engagement on a  range of policy, programmatic, and operational issues; and positions the Agency to influence  collective response to emergency needs across the globe. 

The Office of Technical and Program Quality (TPQ) leads the Bureau's efforts to provide high quality programmatic and technical leadership, oversight, and guidance. In addition, TPQ leads  the Bureau’s external engagement with academia and coordinates research to advance the  effectiveness, efficiency, and impact of humanitarian and multi-year programming. 

The Office of Humanitarian Business and Management Operations (HBMO) is responsible for  maintaining 24/7 operability by providing leadership, planning, quality assurance, technical  expertise, and process management. HBMO ensures effective stewardship of the Bureau’s support  services, including workforce planning, staffing, financial management, internal controls, facilities  operations and infrastructure. 

The Office of Field and Response Operations (FARO) leads and manages operational assistance  and the purchase and delivery of goods and services in response to declared foreign disasters and  international humanitarian needs in key functional areas, including supply-chain management,  procurement, logistics, oversight, and operational coordination with the U.S. military. 

INTRODUCTION 

The Office of Global Policy, Partnerships, Programs, and Communications (G3PC) shapes and  influences USAID’s role within the international humanitarian system; leads engagement on a 

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range of policy, programmatic, and operational issues; and positions the Agency to influence  collective response to emergency needs across the globe. The office is organized into seven  divisions, namely, Humanitarian Policy and International Systems; Humanitarian Multilateral;  Humanitarian Organizations and Partnerships; Private Sector Engagement, Diaspora, and  Innovation; Global Capacity and Leadership Development; U.S. Engagement, Strategy, and  Programs; and Strategic Communications and Humanitarian Information (SCHI).  

G3PC, through its SCHI Division, plays a critical role in strategic communications and  humanitarian information and is responsible for providing strategic communications guidance for  the Bureau, as well as managing and coordinating bureau-level external and internal  communications. This includes positioning BHA as a leader in humanitarian messaging by  showcasing our high-profile disaster responses and creating a wide range of public information  products with close coordination with other external communications and press offices within  USAID and the broader USG interagency. This division also analyzes BHA’s communication  activities, develops and implements comprehensive strategies, and creates content to increase  awareness of BHA’s impact, expertise, and value added to internal and external audiences. It  includes the Humanitarian Information Teams for Global and Africa; Outreach and Internal  Communications Team; Content Development and Online Communications Team; and Press and  Strategic Communications Team.  

The Content Development and Online Communications Team is responsible for producing  innovative and compelling content that broadly informs the public about the work BHA does  around the world and positions the Bureau as a go-to source for information. The team takes the  lead on creating stories, videos, interactive maps, social media posts, infographics, motion  graphics, and other content—working in coordination with BHA staff, especially members of the  SCHI Division. The team also coordinates BHA’s public messaging campaigns with USAID’s  Bureau for Legislative and Public Affairs (LPA) and ensures that BHA’s equities are well  represented in Agency-wide campaigns. In addition, the team maintains BHA’s webpages on  usaid.gov, BHA’s social media platforms, and manages the Bureau’s “Cash is Best” campaign on  Center for International Disaster Information website (cidi.org). 

  

OBJECTIVE 

BHA requires the services of a Content and Digital Communications Advisor to lead efforts to  produce innovative and compelling content and social media posts that broadly inform the public  about BHA’s activities and positions the Bureau as a go-to source for humanitarian information. 

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

The Content and Digital Communications Advisor will work closely with other members of the  SCHI Division to develop and implement strategies to increase awareness and appreciation for  BHA and partner activities. The Content and Digital Communications Advisor will report to the  Content Development and Online Communications Team Lead and work closely with other teams  within the SCHI Division, including the Press and Strategic Communications Team and with the  other offices of BHA. 

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Content Creation 

  • Conceptualize and develop external messaging products that best showcase BHA’s work,  including blogs, success stories, graphics, videos, and other content.  
  • Engage in every phase of the content production process—drafting, editing, proofreading,  and publishing—working in coordination with BHA Geographic Offices, SCHI Division  colleagues, and other members of the Content Development and Online Communications  Team.  
  • Identify and create compelling stories (written, video, audio) and develop multimedia  content for social media networks that bring our activities, programs, and beneficiaries to  life in new ways.  
  • Create next level “evergreen” content about BHA’s staff, mission, technical expertise,  operational capabilities, and other priorities.  
  • Work with the broader SCHI Division to identify and develop strategic messages for  BHA’s overall work and individual responses and ensure these are incorporated into  communications materials and projects produced by the Content Development and Online  Communications Team. 
  • Research emerging technologies and messaging trends to tell engaging stories that also  helps BHA reach a new and larger audience. Implement new strategies in close  coordination with the Content Development and Online Communications Team Lead. 
  • Draft social media posts for BHA’s Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts. ● Monitor and analyze social media trends to advise on keeping BHA’s social media  platforms in line with current trends. Look for new engagement opportunities and  messaging methods. 
  • Provide editorial, creative, and technical support to team members. Review and provide  constructive feedback to improve content quality across the team, SCHI, and BHA.  ● Serve as in-house visual expert on still photography, video, and multimedia content,  reviewing visual assets with a seasoned eye that allows BHA to present itself in an  impactful way. Assist in the management of BHA’s photo database in close coordination  with the Content Development and Online Communications Team Lead and Graphic  Creative Coordinator.  
  • Work closely with BHA graphic designers and Geographic Information Unit on the  development of new visual content—including graphics, infographics, videos, interactive  maps, and multimedia content—ensuring consistency in editorial style and visual identity.  
  • Ensure content developed by the Content Development and Online Communications Team  meets BHA and USAID visual communication standards. 
  • Manage BHA’s Medium blog, working in close collaboration with the Content  Development and Online Communications Team Lead on the editorial calendar,  production, layout, publishing, and promotion. 
  • Manage and coordinate BHA’s public messaging campaigns, working in close  coordination with the Content Development and Online Communications Team Lead and 

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SCHI Division staff members to carry them out. Create and implement new public  messaging campaigns that enhance and amplify the Bureau’s activities.  

  • Foster cross-team collaboration with press, internal communications, humanitarian  information, programmatic, technical, and other BHA staff around messaging campaigns,  content creation, and content promotion efforts. Work with these teams to build a culture  of storytelling and creativity. 
  • Work closely with LPA to ensure that BHA’s activities are best showcased in USAID-wide  messaging campaigns and on its social media platforms.  
  • Work closely with the broader SCHI Division, BHA offices, and LPA to ensure that digital  and visual communication efforts are responsive to current priorities, key messaging  strategies, and evolving needs. 

Response and Resilience Focus 

  • Facilitate coordinated, timely, and targeted creative content and online communications  support to BHA staff and geographic offices during disaster responses and emergencies  that communicate BHA’s impact, expertise, and value to external audiences. 
  • During BHA disaster responses, work with the Press and Strategic Communications Team  to create timely social media posts and strategic content that draw in people to learn more  about BHA’s activities. 
  • Travel to disaster locations and programmatic sites, as needed, to take photos or shoot  video footage of BHA activities for hands-on creation of multimedia content. Work on  location with contracted videographers and photographers, as needed, to support the  development of creative content highlighting BHA’s efforts and partner activities.  
  • Facilitate the development of visual media and online content that articulates BHA’s  resilience, risk reduction, and recovery work. 
  • Sign up for and serve as needed on Washington-based Response Management Teams  (RMTs), which provide services and support to Disaster Assistance Response Teams  (DARTs) deployed in response to disasters. The duties on RMTs will vary. 
  • As needed, serve on DARTs which may require immediate (within 24 hours) deployment  overseas for an extended period of time. 

Other Duties 

  • Serve as a BHA representative in relevant USAID or USG meetings pertaining to content,  social media, and digital communications. 
  • Mentor and assist in the development of other Content Development and Online  Communications Team members and SCHI Division staff on content creation and  storytelling. 
  • Serve as the BHA after-hours duty officer on a rotational basis for approximately one week  every six months.

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  • As needed, may serve on temporary detail within the Bureau. Duties performed while on  detail will be aligned with the Team’s existing duties and responsibilities and will be  directly related to the statement of duties provided. 
  • Become certified and serve as an Agreement Officer’s Representative/Contracting  Officer’s Representative (AOR/COR), as assigned. The AOR/COR provides financial and  programmatic oversight of all aspects of managing the agreement or contract; this includes  but is not limited to reviewing invoices, requests for approvals, program/project  deliverables (i.e., work plans, annual reports, month status reports), travel requests, key  personnel requests, and financial/budget reports. They are responsible for drafting and  submitting the annual contractor performance evaluation in Contract/Assistance  Performance Assessment Review System. They prepare and review contract/assistance  modifications documentation and assist the Contracting/Agreement Officer to ensure  performance is compliant with the terms and conditions of the contract/agreement, the  FAR, and USAID policy. AOR/CORs are responsible for all related requirements in the COR designation letter and the AOR designation letter
  • Consistently model behaviors that demonstrate a commitment to fostering a non-hostile  work environment free of discrimination, bias, unfairness, exclusion, offensive behaviors,  and harassment of any kind. 
  • Contribute to a collaborative, respectful, and professional work environment by  demonstrating partnership and teamwork to accomplish team, office, and Bureau  objectives. 
  • Participate in G3PC office-wide efforts to advance diversity, equity, inclusion, and  accessibility, including those related to Bureau programs, partners, staffing, professional  development, and other key areas. 

SUPERVISORY RELATIONSHIP: 

The USPSC will take direction from and will report to the Content Development and Online  Communications Team Leader, with guidance from the Division Chief or a designee of the  Strategic Communications and Humanitarian Information Division. 

SUPERVISORY CONTROLS: 

Supervisor sets overall objectives and resources available; the USPSC consults with the supervisor  to develop deadlines, projects, and work to be done. The USPSC is responsible for planning and  carrying out assignments. The USPSC is responsible for planning approaches or methodology to  be used in carrying out assignments. 

  1. PHYSICAL DEMANDS  

The work is generally sedentary and does not pose undue physical demands. During deployment  on DARTs (if required), and during site visits, there may be some additional physical exertion  including long periods of standing, walking over rough terrain, or carrying of moderately heavy  items (less than 50 pounds).

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  1. WORK ENVIRONMENT 

Work is primarily performed in an office setting. During deployment on DARTs (if required), and  during site visits, the work may additionally involve special safety and/or security precautions,  wearing of protective equipment, and exposure to severe weather conditions. 

  1. START DATE: Immediately, once necessary clearances are obtained.  II. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRED FOR THIS POSITION

EDUCATION/EXPERIENCE REQUIRED FOR THIS POSITION 

(Determines basic eligibility for the position. Offerors who do not meet all of the education and  experience factors are considered NOT qualified for the position.) 

High School Diploma, plus eleven (9) years of progressively responsible experience working on  communications issues. 

OR 

Bachelor’s degree, plus seven (7) years of progressively responsible experience working on  communications issues. 

OR 

Master’s degree, plus five (5) years of progressively responsible experience working on  communications issues. 

III. EVALUATION AND SELECTION FACTORS 

The Government may award a contract without discussions with offerors in accordance with FAR  52.215-1. The CO reserves the right at any point in the evaluation process to establish a competitive  range of offerors with whom negotiations will be conducted pursuant to FAR 15.306(c). In  accordance with FAR 52.215-1, if the CO determines that the number of offers that would  otherwise be in the competitive range exceeds the number at which an efficient competition can  be conducted, the CO may limit the number of offerors in the competitive range to the greatest  number that will permit an efficient competition among the most highly rated offers. FAR  provisions of this solicitation are available at https://www.acquisition.gov/browse/index/far.  

SELECTION FACTORS 

(Determines basic eligibility for the position. Offerors who do not meet all of the selection factors  are considered NOT qualified for the position.) 

  • Offeror is a U.S. Citizen. 
  • Complete resume submitted. See cover page for resume requirements. Experience that  cannot be quantified will not be counted towards meeting the solicitation requirements. USPSC Offeror form AID 309-2. Offerors are required to complete sections A through I.  This form must be physically signed. Electronic signatures will not be accepted.

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  • Ability to obtain and maintain a Secret up to Top Secret/Sensitive Compartmented  Information level clearance as provided by USAID. 
  • Ability to obtain and maintain a Department of State medical clearance throughout the  contract.  
  • Must not appear as an excluded party in the System for Award Management (SAM.gov). Satisfactory verification of academic credentials. 

OFFEROR RATING SYSTEM 

The offeror rating system factors are used to determine the competitive ranking of qualified  offerors in comparison to other offerors. Offerors must demonstrate the rating factors outlined  below within their resume, as they are evaluated strictly by the information provided. The  evaluation of writing tests will also take into consideration the quality of written responses.  Aspects of written responses including, but not limited to typos, grammatical errors, spelling  errors, and incomplete sentences will be factored into the evaluation process. The rating factors  are as follows:  

Professional Experience (10 points): 

  • Demonstrated experience developing and managing external communications products. (5  POINTS) 
  • Demonstrated experience developing and managing public messaging campaigns from  start to finish. (5 POINTS) 

Technical Knowledge (10 points): 

  • Demonstrated technical knowledge and the capability to identify stories that strategically  showcase an organization’s accomplishments and impacts, as well as producing  storytelling content in various media formats (e.g., video, photography, blogs, social  media, etc.), targeting a variety of audiences. 

Interview Performance (35 points) 

Timed Writing Test (40 points) 

Satisfactory Professional Reference Checks (5 points) 

Total Possible Points: 100 

BASIS OF RATING: Offerors who meet the Education/Experience requirements and Selection  Factors will be further evaluated in accordance with the Offeror Rating System. Those offerors  determined to be competitively ranked may also be evaluated on interview performance and  satisfactory professional reference checks. 

Offerors are required to address each factor of the Offeror Rating System in their resume,  describing specifically and accurately what experience, training, education and/or awards they  have received as it pertains to each factor. Be sure to include your name and the announcement  number at the top of each additional page. Failure to address the selection factors and/or Offeror 

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Rating System factors may result in not receiving credit for all pertinent experience, education,  training and/or awards.  

The most qualified offerors may be interviewed and required to provide a writing sample. BHA  will not pay for any expenses associated with the interviews. Professional references and academic  credentials will be evaluated for offerors being considered for selection package. 

Note: Please be advised that references may be obtained independently from other sources in  addition to the ones provided by an offeror. BHA reserves the right to select additional offerors if  vacancies become available during future phase of the selection process. 

  1. SUBMITTING AN OFFER

Offers must be received by the closing date and time at the address specified in the cover letter. Qualified individuals are required to submit: 

  1. Complete resume. In order to fully evaluate your offer, your resume must include: 

(a) Paid and non-paid experience, job title, location(s), dates held (month/year), and hours  worked per week for each position. Any experience that does not include dates  (month/year), locations, and hours per week will not be counted towards meeting the  solicitation requirements. 

(b) Specific duties performed that fully detail the level and complexity of the work.  (c) Education and any other qualifications including job-related training courses, job-related  skills, or job-related honors, awards or accomplishments. Failure to identify an academic  discipline will result in disqualification. 

(d) U.S. Citizenship 

(e) Optional: How did you hear about this opportunity? (SAM.gov, BHA Jobs, Career Fair,  etc.).  

Your resume must contain sufficient information to make a valid determination that you fully  meet the experience requirements as stated in this solicitation. This information must be clearly  identified in your resume. Failure to provide information sufficient to determine your  qualifications for the position will result in loss of full consideration.  

  1. USPSC Offeror form AID 309-2. Offerors are required to complete sections A through I.  This form must be physically signed. Electronic signatures will not be accepted. AID 309-2  is available at http://www.usaid.gov/forms

Additional documents submitted will not be accepted. 

By submitting your offer materials, you certify that all of the information on and attached to the  offer is true, correct, complete, and made in good faith. You agree to allow all information on and  attached to the offer to be investigated. False or fraudulent information on or attached to your offer  may result in you being eliminated from consideration for this position, or being terminated after  award, and may be punishable by fine or imprisonment.

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To ensure consideration of offers for the intended position, please reference the solicitation number  on your offer, and as the subject line in any email. 

DOCUMENT SUBMITTALS 

Via email: BHA.G3PCRecruitment@usaid.gov 

NOTE: If the full security application package is not submitted within 30 days after the Office of  Security determines eligibility, the offer may be rescinded. If a Secret security clearance is not  obtained within nine months after offer acceptance, the offer may be rescinded. If Top Secret is  required, and clearance is not obtained within nine months after award, USAID may terminate the  contract at the convenience of the government. If Sensitive Compartmented Information (SCI)  access is not obtained within nine months after Top Secret clearance is granted, USAID may  terminate the contract at the convenience of the government.  

NOTE: If the full medical clearance package is not submitted within two months after offer  acceptance, the offer may be rescinded. If a Department of State medical clearance is not obtained;  the offer may be rescinded.  

NOTE REGARDING GOVERNMENT OBLIGATIONS FOR THIS SOLICITATION 

This solicitation in no way obligates USAID to award a PSC contract, nor does it commit USAID  to pay any cost incurred in the preparation and submission of the offer. 

NOTE: REGARDING ADEQUATE SAFETY PROTOCOLS FOR FEDERAL  CONTRACTORS 

Ensuring Adequate COVID Safety Protocols for Federal Contractors, dated September 9, 2021  (published in the Federal Register on September 14, 2021, 86 FR 50985). (c) Personal Services  Contracts with individuals. As a matter of policy, the contractor must comply with the USAID’s  guidance applicable to direct-hire federal employees. 

NOTE REGARDING UNIQUE ENTITY IDENTIFIER (UEI) NUMBERS AND THE  SYSTEM FOR AWARD MANAGEMENT 

All USPSCs with a place of performance in the United States are required to have a Unique Entity  Identifier (UEI) number and be registered in the System for Award Management (SAM) database  prior to receiving an offer. You will be disqualified if you either fail to comply with this  requirement or if your name appears on the excluded parties list. The selectee will be provided  with guidance regarding this registration.  

NOTE: Registration for a UEI number is FREE

For general information about UEI Numbers, please refer to Federal Acquisition Regulation  (FAR) Clause 52.204-6, Unique Entity Identifier at https://www.acquisition.gov/far/part-

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52#FAR_52_204 and FAR 52.204-6, System for Award Management at  

https://www.acquisition.gov/far/part-52#FAR_52_204 or www.sam.gov

  1. LIST OF REQUIRED FORMS PRIOR TO AWARD

The CO will provide instructions about how to complete and submit the following forms after an  offeror is selected for the contract award.  

Forms outlined below can be found at: 

http://www.usaid.gov/forms/ or at http://www.forms.gov/bgfPortal/main.do 

  1. Resume. 
  2. USPSC Offeror Form (AID 309-2) 
  3. Medical History and Examination Form (DS-6561). ** 
  4. Questionnaire for Sensitive Positions (for National Security) (SF-86), or ** 5. Questionnaire for Non-Sensitive Positions (SF-85). ** 
  5. Finger Print Card (FD-258). ** 
  6. Employment Eligibility Verification (I-9 Form). ** 

** Forms 3 through 7 shall be completed ONLY upon the advice of the Contracting Officer that  an offeror is the successful candidate for the job. 

  1. BENEFITS AND ALLOWANCES

As a matter of policy, and as appropriate, a USPSC is normally authorized the following benefits  and allowances:  

  1. BENEFITS:  

(a) Employer's FICA Contribution  

(b) Contribution toward Health & Life Insurance  

(c) Pay Comparability Adjustment  

(d) Annual Increase (pending a satisfactory performance evaluation)  

(e) Eligibility for Worker's Compensation  

(f) Annual and Sick Leave  

  1. ALLOWANCES  

Section numbers refer to rules from the Department of State Standardized Regulations  (Government Civilians Foreign Areas), available at  

https://aoprals.state.gov/content.asp?content_id=282&menu_id=101 

(a) Temporary Lodging Allowance (Section 120). 

(b) Living Quarters Allowance (Section 130). 

(c) Post Allowance (Section 220). 

(d) Supplemental Post Allowance (Section 230). 

(e) Separate Maintenance Allowance (Section 260). 

(f) Education Allowance (Section 270).

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(g) Education Travel (Section 280). 

(h) Post Differential (Chapter 500). 

(i) Payments during Evacuation/Authorized Departure (Section 600), and (j) Danger Pay (Section 650). 

VII. TAXES  

USPSCs are required to pay Federal income taxes, FICA, Medicare and applicable State Income  taxes.  

VIII. USAID REGULATIONS, POLICIES AND CONTRACT CLAUSES PERTAINING  TO PSCs  

USAID regulations and policies governing USPSC awards are available at these sources:  

  1. USAID Acquisition Regulation (AIDAR), Appendix D, “Direct USAID Contracts with a  U.S. Citizen or a U.S. Resident Alien for Personal Services Abroad,” including contract clause  “General Provisions,” available at  

https://www.usaid.gov/sites/default/files/documents/1868/aidar_0.pdf .  

ADS 309 – Personal Services Contracts can be found at:  

https://www.usaid.gov/sites/default/files/documents/1868/309.pdf 

  1. Contract Cover Page form AID 309-1 available at https://www.usaid.gov/forms Five Year Table – Content and Digital Communications Advisor
ITEM NO  (A)  SUPPLIES/SERVICES (DESCRIPTION)  (B)  QUANTIT 

Y  

(C)  UNIT  

(D)  UNIT  

PRICE  

(E)  AMOUNT  (F)  0001  Base Year 1 - Compensation, Fringe Benefits  and Other Direct Costs (ODCs)  

- Award Type: Cost  

- Product Service Code: 497 

- Accounting Info: [Insert from Phoenix] LOT  $ ___  $___  0002  Base Year 2 - Compensation, Fringe Benefits  and Other Direct Costs (ODCs)  

- Award Type: Cost  

- Product Service Code: 497 

- Accounting Info: [Insert from Phoenix] LOT  $ ___  $___  0003  Base Year 3 - Compensation, Fringe Benefits  and Other Direct Costs (ODCs)  

- Award Type: Cost  

- Product Service Code: 497 

- Accounting Info: [Insert from Phoenix] LOT  $ ___  $___  0004  Base Year 4 - Compensation, Fringe Benefits  and Other Direct Costs (ODCs)  

- Award Type: Cost  

- Product Service Code: 497 

- Accounting Info: [Insert from Phoenix] LOT  $ ___  $___ 

 

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720BHA22R00021 

0005  Base Year 5 - Compensation, Fringe Benefits  and Other Direct Costs (ODCs)  

- Award Type: Cost  

- Product Service Code: 497 

- Accounting Info: [Insert from Phoenix] LOT  $ ___  $___ 

 

  1. Acquisition and Assistance Policy Directives/Contract Information Bulletins (AAPDs/CIBs)  for Personal Services Contracts with Individuals available at http://www.usaid.gov/work usaid/aapds-cibs .  

AAPD 06-10 – PSC Medical Expense Payment Responsibility 

AAPD No. 06-10 is hereby incorporated as Attachment 1 to the solicitation. 

AAPD 21-05 – Revised and Expanded Fringe Benefits for U.S. Personal Services  Contractors 

AAPD No. 21-05 is hereby incorporated as Attachment 2 to the solicitation. 

AAPD 18-02 Revised - Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) Services 

AAPD No. 18-02 is hereby incorporated as Attachment 3 to the solicitation. 

FAR 52.222-50 – Revised Combating Trafficking in Persons  

FAR Clause 52.222-50 is hereby incorporated as Attachment 4 to the solicitation. 

FAR 52.223-99—Ensuring Adequate COVID-19 Safety Protocols for Federal Contractors  FAR Clause 52.223-99 is hereby incorporated as Attachment 5 to the solicitation. 

  1. Ethical Conduct. By the acceptance of a USAID personal services contract as an individual,  the contractor will be acknowledging receipt of the “Standards of Ethical Conduct for  Employees of the Executive Branch,” available from the U.S. Office of Government Ethics, in  accordance with General Provision 2 and 5 CFR 2635. See  https://www.oge.gov/web/oge.nsf/OGE%20Regulations

ALL QUALIFIED OFFERORS WILL BE CONSIDERED REGARDLESS OF AGE, RACE,  COLOR, SEX, CREED, NATIONAL ORIGIN, LAWFUL POLITICAL AFFILIATION, NON DISQUALIFYING DISABILITY, MARITAL STATUS, SEXUAL ORIENTATION,  AFFILIATION WITH AN EMPLOYEE ORGANIZATION, OR OTHER NON-MERIT  FACTOR. 

ATTACHMENT 1 

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720BHA22R00021 

USPSC PROVISION “MEDICAL EXPENSE PAYMENT RESPONSIBILITY (OCTOBER  2006) 

MEDICAL EXPENSE PAYMENT RESPONSIBILITY (OCTOBER 2006)  

(a) Definitions. Terms used in this General Provision are defined in 16 FAM 116 (available at  http://www.foia.state.gov/REGS/fams.asp?level=2&id=59&fam=0). Note: personal services  contractors are not eligible to participate in the Federal Employees Health Programs.  

(b) The regulations in the Foreign Affairs Manual, Volume 16, Chapter 520 (16 FAM 520),  Responsibility for Payment of Medical Expenses, apply to this contract, except as stated below.  The contractor and each eligible family member are strongly encouraged to obtain health insurance  that covers this assignment. Nothing in this provision supersedes or contradicts any other term or  provision in this contract that pertains to insurance or medical costs, except that section (e)  supplements General Provision 25. “MEDICAL EVACUATION (MEDEVAC) SERVICES.”  

(c) When the contractor or eligible family member is covered by health insurance, that insurance  is the primary payer for medical services provided to that contractor or eligible family member(s)  both in the United States and abroad. The primary insurer’s liability is determined by the terms,  conditions, limitations, and exclusions of the insurance policy. When the contractor or eligible  family member is not covered by health insurance, the contractor is the primary payer for the total  amount of medical costs incurred and the U.S. Government has no payment obligation  

(see paragraph (f) of this provision).  

(d) USAID serves as a secondary payer for medical expenses of the contractor and eligible family  members who are covered by health insurance, where the following conditions are met:  

(1) The illness, injury, or medical condition giving rise to the expense is incurred, caused,  or materially aggravated while the eligible individual is stationed or assigned abroad;  

(2) The illness, injury, or medical condition giving rise to the expense required or requires  hospitalization and the expense is directly related to the treatment of such illness, injury,  or medical condition, including obstetrical care; and  

(3) The Office of Medical Services (M/MED) or a Foreign Service medical provider  (FSMP) determines that the treatment is appropriate for, and directly related to, the illness,  injury, or medical condition.  

(e) The Mission Director may, on the advice of M/MED or an FSMP at post, authorize medical  travel for the contractor or an eligible family member in accordance with the General Provision  10, Travel and Transportation AAPD 06-10 PSC Medical Expense Payment Responsibility 6  Expenses (July 1993), section (i) entitled “Emergency and Irregular Travel and Transportation.”  In the event of a medical emergency, when time does not permit consultation, the Mission Director  may issue a Travel Authorization Form or Medical Services Authorization Form DS-3067,  provided that the FSMP or Post Medical Advisor (PMA) is notified as soon as possible following 

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such an issuance. The contractor must promptly file a claim with his or her medevac insurance  provider and repay to USAID any amount the medevac insurer pays for medical travel, up to the  amount USAID paid under this section. The contractor must repay USAID for medical costs paid  by the medevac insurer in accordance with sections (f) and (g) below. In order for medical travel  to be an allowable cost under General Provision 10, the contractor must provide USAID written  evidence that medevac insurance does not cover these medical travel costs.  

(f) If the contractor or eligible family member is not covered by primary health insurance, the  contractor is the primary payer for the total amount of medical costs incurred. In the event of a  medical emergency, the Medical and Health Program may authorize issuance of Form DS-3067,  Authorization for Medical Services for Employees and/or Dependents, to secure admission to a  hospital located abroad for the uninsured contractor or eligible family member.  

In that case, the contractor will be required to reimburse USAID in full for funds advanced by  USAID pursuant to the issuance of the authorization. The contractor may reimburse USAID  directly or USAID may offset the cost from the contractor’s invoice payments under this contract,  any other contract the individual has with the U.S. Government, or through any other available  debt collection mechanism.  

(g) When USAID pays medical expenses (e.g., pursuant to Form DS-3067, Authorization for  Medical Services for Employees and/or Dependents), repayment must be made to USAID either  by insurance payment or directly by the contractor, except for the amount of such expenses USAID  is obligated to pay under this provision. The Contracting Officer will determine the repayment  amount in accordance with the terms of this provision and the policies and procedures for  employees contained in 16 FAM 521. When USAID pays the medical expenses, including medical  travel costs (see section (e) above), of an individual (either the contractor or an eligible family  member) who is covered by insurance, that individual promptly must claim his or her benefits  under any applicable insurance policy or policies. As soon as the individual receives the insurance  payment, the contractor must reimburse USAID for the full amount that USAID paid on the  individual’s behalf or the repayment amount determined by the Contracting Officer in accordance  with this paragraph, whichever is less. If an individual is not covered by insurance, the contractor  must reimburse USAID for the entire amount of all medical expenses and any travel costs the  contractor receives from his/her medevac provider.  

(h) In the event that the contractor or eligible family member fails to recover insurance payments  or transfer the amount of such payments to USAID within 90 days, USAID will take appropriate  action to collect the payments due, unless such failure is for reasons beyond the control of the  USPSC/dependent. (i) Before departing post or terminating the contract, the contractor must settle  all medical expense and medical travel costs. If the contractor is insured, he or she must provide  proof to the Contracting AAPD 06-10 PSC Medical Expense Payment Responsibility 7 Officer  that those insurance claims have been submitted to the insurance carrier(s) and sign a repayment  agreement to repay to USAID any amounts paid by the insurance carrier(s).  

[End of Provision] 

ATTACHMENT 2

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720BHA22R00021 

  1. 5 Leave and Holidays (NOV 2021) 

(Pursuant to class deviation #M/OAA-DEV-AIDAR-22-1-c) 

(a) Annual Leave  

(1) The contractor is not entitled to annual leave if the period of performance of this contract  is 90 days or less. If the contract period of performance is more than 90 days, the contractor  shall earn annual leave as of the start date of the contract period of performance as specified  in paragraph (a)(2) below.  

(i) If the contract period of performance is ninety (90) calendar days or more,  and the contractor's performance is continuous for the contract period of  

performance, the contractor is entitled to accrue annual leave as of the start  

date of the contract. 

(ii) If the contract period of performance is ninety (90) calendar days or more,  and the contractor's performance is not continuous during the contract  

period of performance, the contractor is entitled to accrue annual leave only  

for each instance of continuous performance of ninety (90) calendar days or  

more. 

(iii) If the contract period of performance is less than ninety (90) calendar days,  the contractor is not entitled to accrue annual leave. 

(2) The rate at which the contractor will accrue annual leave is based on the contractor's time  in service according to the table of this paragraph (a)(2). The accrual rates are based on a full time, 40-hour workweek, which will be prorated if the contract provides for a shorter  workweek: 

Time in Service  Annual Leave (AL) Accrual Calculation 0 to 3 years  Four hours of leave for each two week period  over 3, and up to 15 years  Six hours of AL for each two week period  (including 10 hours AL for the final pay  period of a calendar year)  over 15 years  Eight hours of AL for each two week period 

 

(i) USAID will calculate the time in service based on all the previous service performed by  the contractor as—:  

(A) An individual personal services contractor with USAID for any duration  covered by Sec. 636(a)(3) of the FAA or other statutory authority applicable to USAID;  and/or  

(B) A former U.S. Government (USG) direct-hire civilian employee; and/or 

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(C) An honorable active-duty member of the uniformed services based on the  definition in 5 U.S.C. 2101(3).  

(ii) In addition to the information certified by the contractor in their Offeror  Information form, the contracting officer may require the contractor to furnish copies of  previously executed contracts, and/or other evidence of previous service (e.g., SF 50, DD  Form 214 or 215) to conduct the due diligence necessary to verify creditable previous  service.  

(3) Annual Leave is provided under this contract primarily for the purposes of providing  the contractor necessary rest and recreation during the period of performance. The  contractor, in consultation with the Supervisor, must develop an annual leave schedule  early in the period of performance, taking into consideration the requirements of the  position, the contractor's preference, and other factors. The maximum amount of annual  leave that the contractor can carry over from one leave year to the next is limited to 240  hours. The contractor's unused annual leave balance in excess of the 240-hour maximum  at the end of the last pay period of each leave year will be forfeited, unless the requirements  of the position precluded the contractor from taking such leave. The contractor may be  authorized to restore annual leave for exceptional circumstances beyond the control of the  contractor. The restoration of annual leave may be approved only by the USAID  Administrator, cognizant Assistant Administrator or Head of an Independent Office  reporting directly to the USAID Administrator and cannot be delegated further. Annual  leave restored must be scheduled and used no later than the earlier of either— 

(i) The end of the leave year two years after the date fixed by the approving official  as the termination date of the exceptional circumstances beyond the contractor's control,  which resulted in the forfeiture; or  

(ii) The end of the contract.  

(4) The contractor must use all accrued annual leave during the period of performance. At  the end of the contract, the contractor will forfeit any unused annual leave except where  the requirements of the position precluded the contractor from taking annual leave. In this  case, the contracting officer may authorize the following:  

(i) The contractor to take annual leave during the concluding weeks of the contract,  not to exceed the period of performance; or (ii) Payment of a lump-sum for annual leave  not taken based on a signed, written determination and findings (D&F) from the  contractor's supervisor. The D&F must set out the facts and circumstances that prevented  the contractor from taking annual leave, and the contracting officer must find that the  contractor did not cause, or have the ability to control, such facts and circumstances. This  lump-sum payment must not exceed the number of days the contractor could have accrued  during a twelve (12)-month period based on the contractor's accrual rate.  

(5) The contractor may be granted advanced annual leave by the contracting officer when  circumstances warrant. Advanced leave must be approved by the Mission Director, 

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cognizant Assistant Administrator, or Head of an Independent Office reporting directly to  the Administrator, as appropriate. In no case may the contracting officer grant advanced  annual leave in excess of the amount the contractor can accrue in a twelve (12)-month  period or over the life of the contract, whichever is less. At the end of the period of  performance or at termination, the contractor must reimburse USAID for any outstanding  balance of advanced annual leave provided to the contractor under the contract.  

(b) Sick Leave. The contractor may use sick leave on the same basis and for the same purposes as USAID direct-hire employees. The contractor will accrue sick leave at a  rate not to exceed four (4) hours every two (2) weeks for a maximum of thirteen (13) work days per year based on a full-time, 40-hour workweek, and the rate of accrual will be  prorated if the contract provides for a shorter workweek. The contractor may carry over  unused sick leave from year to year under the same contract, and to a new follow-on  contract for the same work at the same place of performance. The contractor is not  authorized to carry over sick leave to a new contract for a different position or at a different  location. The contractor will not be compensated for unused sick leave at the completion  of this contract.  

(c) Home Leave. (1) The contractor may be granted home leave to be taken only in  the U.S., its commonwealth, possessions, or territories, in one continuous period, under the  following conditions:  

(i) The contractor must complete twenty-four (24) continuous months of service  abroad under this contract and must not have taken more than thirty (30) workdays leave  (annual, sick, or LWOP) in the U.S., its commonwealths, possessions, or territories. The  required service abroad will include the actual days in orientation in the U.S. (excluding  any language training), travel time by the most direct route, and actual days abroad  beginning on the date of arrival in the cooperating country. Any annual and sick leave taken  abroad, excluding leave without pay (LWOP), will count toward the period of service  abroad. Any days of annual and sick leave taken in the U.S., its commonwealths,  possessions, or territories will not be counted toward the required twenty-four (24) months  of service abroad.  

(ii) The contractor must agree to return immediately after completing home leave  to continue performance for an additional— 

(A) Two (2) years, or  

(B) Not less than one (1) year, if approved in writing by the Mission Director before the  contractor departs on home leave.  

(iii) If the contractor agrees to meet the conditions in paragraph (c)(1)(ii) of this clause  above by returning to the same USAID Mission under this contract or a new contract, the  contractor may be granted thirty (30) workdays of home leave.  

(iv) If the contractor agrees to meet the continued performance conditions of paragraph  (c)(1)(ii) of this clause and will be relocating to a different USAID Mission under a new USAID  personal services contract immediately following the completion of home leave, the contractor 

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may be granted twenty (20) workdays of home leave. USAID will provide the contractor these  twenty days of home leave under this contract, not under the new contract.  

(v) If home leave eligibility is based on paragraph (c)(1)(iv) of this clause, prior to  departure on home leave, the contractor must submit to the contracting officer at the current  Mission, a copy of the new contract with a special award condition in the contract Schedule  indicating the contractor's obligation to fulfill the commitment for continued performance in  accordance with paragraph (c)(1)(ii) of this clause.  

(2) Notwithstanding the requirements in paragraph (c)(1) of this clause, the contractor may  be granted advanced home leave subject to all of the following conditions:  

(i) Granting of advanced home leave would serve in each case to advance the attainment  of the objectives of this contract; and  

(ii) The contractor has served at least eighteen (18) months abroad, as defined in paragraph  (c)(4) of this clause, at the same USAID Mission under this contract, and has not taken more than  30 work days leave (annual, sick or LWOP) in the U.S.; and  

(iii) The contractor agrees to return immediately to the same Mission to complete the time  remaining to meet the twenty-four (24) month period of service required for home leave, which  begins after the contractor returns from home leave, plus an additional— 

(A) Two (2) years, or  

(B) Not less than one (1) year, if approved by the Mission Director, under the current  contract, or under a new contract for the same or similar services at the same Mission, before the  contractor departs on home leave.  

(3)(i) Home leave must be taken only in the U.S., its commonwealths, possessions, or  territories. Any days spent in any other location will be charged to annual leave, or if the contractor  does not have accrued annual leave to cover these days, the contractor will be placed on LWOP.  

(ii) Travel time by the most direct route is authorized in addition to the home leave  authorized under this “Leave and Holidays” clause. Salary during travel to and from the U.S. for  home leave will be limited to the time required for travel by the most direct and expeditious route.  Additional home leave travel requirements are included in the “Travel and Transportation  Expenses” clause of this contract.  

(iii) Except for reasons beyond the contractor's control as determined by the contracting  officer, the contractor must return abroad immediately after home leave to fulfill the additional  required continued performance of services for any home leave provided under this contract, or  else the contractor must reimburse USAID for the salary and benefits costs of home leave, travel  and transportation, and any other payments related to home leave.  

(iv) Unused home leave is not reimbursable under this contract.  

(4) The contracting officer may authorize the contractor to spend no more than five (5)  days in work status for consultation at USAID/Washington while on home leave in the U.S., before  returning abroad. Consultation in excess of five (5) days or at locations other than 

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USAID/Washington must be approved in advance by the Mission Director or the contracting  officer.  

(d) Home Leave for Qualifying Posts. (1) If the contractor ordinarily qualifies for  home leave and has completed a 12-month period at one of the USAID qualifying  Missions, as announced by the Department of State or USAID, the contractor is entitled to  ten (10) workdays of home leave in addition to the home leave the contractor is normally  entitled to in accordance with paragraph (c) of this “Leave and Holidays” clause.  

(2) There is no requirement that an eligible contractor take this additional home  leave for qualifying Missions; it is for use at the contractor's option. If the contractor is  eligible and elects to take such home leave, the contractor must take all ten (10) workdays  at one time in the U.S. under the conditions described in paragraphs (c)(3) and (c)(4) of  this clause. If the contractor is returning to the U.S. and not returning abroad to the same  or different USAID Mission, the contractor is not eligible for home leave for qualifying  Missions, and this paragraph (d) will not apply.  

(e) Holidays and Administrative Leave. The contractor is entitled to all holidays and  administrative leave granted by USAID to U.S. direct-hire employees as announced by the Agency  or Mission. 

(f) Military Leave. Military leave of not more than 15 calendar days in any  calendar year may be granted to a contractor who is a reservist of the U.S. Armed Forces.  The contractor must provide advance notice of the pending military leave to the  Contracting Officer, or the Mission Director as soon as known. A copy of any such notice  must be part of the contract file.  

(g) Leave Without Pay (LWOP). LWOP may be granted only with the written  approval of the Contracting Officer or Mission Director, unless a USPSC is requesting for  such leave for family and leave purposes under paragraph (i) below.  

(h) Compensatory Time. USAID may grant compensatory time off only with the  written approval of the contracting officer or Mission Director in rare instances when it has  been determined absolutely essential and consistent with the policies that apply to USAID  U.S. direct hire employees. The contractor may use earned compensatory time off in  accordance with policies that apply to USAID direct-hire employees. 

(i) Family and Medical Leave (FML)  

(1) USAID provides family and medical leave (FML) for eligible USPSCs working within the  U.S., or any Territories or possession of the United States, in accordance with Title I of the  Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993, as amended, and as administered by the Department of  Labor under 29 CFR 825. USAID is also extending FML to eligible USPSCs working outside  the U.S., or any Territories or possession of the U.S., in accordance with this paragraph (i) as a  matter of policy discretion.  

(2) FML only applies to USPSCs, not any other type of PSC. 

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(3) In accordance with 29 CFR 825.110, to be eligible for family and medical leave, the  contractor must have-- 

(i) Been employed or under contract for at least twelve (12) months with a  U.S. federal agency as a direct-hire or a personal services contractor; and  (ii) Performed at least 1,250 hours of service with a U.S. federal agency as a  direct hire or a personal services contractor during the previous 12-month  period immediately preceding the commencement of family and medical  leave. 

(4) In accordance with 29 CFR 825.200(a), and USAID's internal policies available in  Automated Directive System Chapter 309 (ADS 309), an eligible contractor may take up to  twelve (12) workweeks of leave under FMLA, Title I, in any 12-month period for the reasons  specified in 29 CFR 825.112.  

(5) In accordance with 29 CFR part 825.207, the contractor may take LWOP for family and  medical leave purposes. However, the contractor may choose to substitute LWOP with accrued  annual or sick leave earned under the terms of this contract. If the contractor does not choose to  substitute accrued paid leave, the contracting officer, in consultation with the contractor’s  supervisor, may require the contractor to substitute accrued paid leave for LWOP. The  contracting officer must obtain the required certifications for approval of family medical leave  in accordance with USAID policy. The contractor must notify the contractor's Supervisor of the  intent to substitute paid leave for LWOP prior to the date such paid leave commences. After  having invoked the entitlement to family and medical leave and taking LWOP for that purpose,  the contractor cannot retroactively substitute paid leave for the LWOP already taken under  family and medical leave. 

(6) FML is not authorized for any period beyond the completion date of this contract.  

(7) When requesting family medical leave, the contractor must submit the relevant leave  request in writing, including certifications and other supporting documents required by 29  CFR 825 and USAID policy in ADS 309. 

(8) The U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL’s) Wage and Hour Division (WHD) Publication  1420 explains the FMLA’s provisions and provides information concerning procedures for  filing complaints for violations of the Act.  

(j) Paid Parental Leave.  

 (1) If the contractor is eligible for family and medical leave in accordance with  paragraph (i) “Family and Medical Leave” of this clause, then instead of family and  medical leave, the contractor may be authorized to take paid parental leave as  specified in this paragraph, similar to that provided to USAID direct-hire  employees. When authorized to do so by the contracting officer, the contractor may  elect to substitute paid parental leave for up to twelve (12) workweeks of family and  medical leave, as specified in paragraph (i) of this clause. The contractor may take  such paid parental leave after the occurrence of the birth or placement of a child 

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which results in the contractor assuming and continuing a parental role with respect  to the newly born or placed child in accordance with the requirements of this paragraph (j).  

 (2) Paid parental leave may be taken intermittently or on a reduced leave  schedule, subject to the mutual agreement of the contractor and their supervisor.  Paid parental leave must be used no later than the end of the 12-month period  beginning on the date of the birth or placement involved. At the end of that 12- 

month period, any unused balance of paid parental leave expires and is not available  for future use. No payment will be made for unused or expired paid parental leave.  Paid parental leave is not annual leave, and thus will not be included in any lump sum payment for annual leave following completion or  

termination of the contract.  

(3) To establish eligibility for paid parental leave, the contracting officer  may require the contractor to provide documentation of entitlement and a signed  certification. Appropriate documentation of entitlement is to show that the  contractor’s use of paid parental leave is directly connected with a birth or  placement that has occurred, such as a birth certificate or a document from an  adoption or foster care agency regarding the placement. By the signed certification,  the contractor is attesting that the paid parental leave is being taken by the  contractor in connection with the documented birth or placement, and that the  contractor has a continuing parental role with respect to the newly born or placed  child.  

(4) (i) The contractor may not use any paid parental leave unless the  contractor agrees in writing, before commencement of the leave, to return  immediately after completing paid parental leave to continue performance under this  contract for at least 12 workweeks. This 12-workweek period of performance  obligation begins on the contractor’s first scheduled workday after the contractor  concludes taking such leave, whether taken consecutively or intermittently,  regardless of the amount of leave taken. The period of performance obligation by  the contractor is fixed at 12 workweeks regardless of the amount of leave used by  the contractor. Due to this 12-workweek mandatory period of performance  obligation, the contracting officer will not authorize paid parental leave for use by  the contractor within the last 12 workweeks before the contract end date, including  option periods if any, regardless of whether exercised. Within the last 24 workweeks  of the contract, because of the mandatory 12-week period of obligation, the  contracting officer will only authorize paid parental leave for any time remaining  before the contract end date beyond the 12-week mandatory period of performance.  Any paid parental leave taken by the contractor as well as the 12-week period of  performance obligation must be completed by the contract end date, including any  option periods, regardless of whether exercised.  

(ii) If the contractor is eligible for paid parental leave, but is physically  or mentally incapable of entering into the period of performance obligation  agreement before the period of leave, such leave may be temporarily authorized,  or retroactively invoked upon return to duty, subject to a determination that, in  the Agency’s judgment, the contractor was incapable of entering into such  agreement in accordance with the requirements of this paragraph (4) at the time 

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of the commencement of the leave entitlement. 

(5) (i) If, during the period of paid parental leave or of the required 12- workweek period of performance obligation, the contractor learns, or decides, they  will not be able or willing to complete the period of performance obligation, the  contractor must notify their supervisor and contracting officer of the situation as  soon as possible. After receiving such notice, the contracting officer will  coordinate with the supervisor to determine whether reimbursement is required in  accordance with this paragraph (5).  

(ii) If the contractor fails to return to work for the required 12-week  obligation, the Agency will require reimbursement from the contractor of an  amount equal to the total amount of the Government contributions paid by  the Agency to or on behalf of the contractor to maintain the contractor’s  health insurance coverage during the period of paid parental leave.  

(iii) The contracting officer may waive the reimbursement requirement of  this paragraph (5) if the contractor is unable to fulfill the required 12-workweek  obligation for any of the following reasons:  

(A) in the Agency’s judgment, the contractor is unable to return to  

work because of the continuation, recurrence, or onset of a serious health  condition (including mental health) of the contractor or the newly born or  placed child—but only if the condition is related to the applicable birth or  placement; or  

(B) in the Agency’ judgment, the contractor is unable to return to  

work due to circumstances beyond the contractor’s control that precludes  performance under the contract; or ( 

  1. C) the contracting officer terminates the contract for convenience in  

accordance with the clause entitled “Termination” or does not exercise any  option period.  

(k) Leave Records. The contractor shall maintain current leave records for himself/herself and  make them available, as requested by the Mission Director or the Contracting Officer.  

[END CLAUSE]

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ATTACHMENT 3 

Title 48 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Chapter 7  

USAID Acquisition Regulation (AIDAR) 

APPENDIX D--DIRECT USAID CONTRACTS WITH A U.S. CITIZEN OR A U.S.  RESIDENT ALIEN FOR PERSONAL SERVICES ABROAD 

GP 25. MEDICAL EVACUATION (MEDEVAC) SERVICES (DEC 2019) (Pursuant to class deviation #M/OAA-DEV-AIDAR-20-3c) 

A contractor who is required to relocate abroad and accompanying eligible family members; or a  contractor on official travel status abroad on temporary duty or training, will be provided Medevac  services through the Department of State, Bureau of Medical Services, similar to that provided to  U.S. Government employees in 16 FAM 300 Medical Travel. Medevac costs that will be covered  by USAID include travel and per diem, but do not include medical care costs. 

To be eligible for Medevac services covered by the Department of State Medevac program, the  contractor and accompanying eligible family members must obtain and maintain international  health insurance coverage in accordance with the clause of the contract entitled, “Insurance.” 

[END CLAUSE]

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